• Participating in the 4th Global Symposium on Health Systems Research
  • Sharing and disseminating HPSR conceptual and methodological innovations
  • Participating in the 3rd Global Symposium on Health Systems Research
  • Building an intellectual hub for HPSR in Cape Town South Africa
  • CHESAI retreats
  • Participating in the 4th Global Symposium on Health Systems Research
  • Building an intellectual hub for HPSR in Cape Town South Africa
  • Supporting African HSPR capacity development
  • CHESAI retreats
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  • CHESAI Graphic 2
  • HSR

Collaboration for Health Systems Analysis and Innovation

A collaborative of health policy and systems researchers based in the Western Cape, South Africa, with a focus on strengthening the health policy and systems research field through conceptual and methodological development, as well as interdisciplinary and multisectoral engagement.
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Collaboration for Health Policy and Systems Analysis in Africa

Decolonial conversations about our HPSR praxis: How do we resist?

When a country gains independence from a colonial power, it does not mean that all the effects of colonialism automatically disappear. Coloniality is the condition that survives beyond the period of colonialism. Where decolonisation describes the process through which direct colonial rule was withdrawn, decoloniality is a political, epistemological and economic liberation project aimed at dislodging coloniality and its manifestations including the coloniality of power, and the coloniality of knowledge.

Considering what a decolonial lens offers us as southern scholars seeking to disrupt patterns of global knowledge production, and reflecting on what it offers us for our own research praxis, Leanne Brady & Lance Louskieter, HPSR PHD candidates at UCT, draw on some critical perspectives to kick start the discussion. Watch recording of the webinar

Cape Town’s response to COVID-19 shows that another kind of society is possible

Cape Town Together and the CANs were catalysed by an unprecedented, global pandemic. This was not an attempt to bring people together under an explicitly municipalist agenda – or under any one coherent political ideology – other than a belief that local knowledge and self-organisation is best placed to respond to certain contextualities of a crisis such as Covid-Guiding principles, such as horizontality, radical generosity and solidarity across class and race lines were arrived at through praxis, rather than a theoretical or ideological positioning.

Yet, under the banner of responding to Covid-19, the CANs demonstrated a different way of doing politics at the municipal level that potentially sets the stage for extended projects in radical democracy and local action to challenge the deep-seated socio-economic inequality and spatial injustice that abounds in the city.

It’s hard to imagine how this reconciles with the inherent hierarchies in our entrenched system of electoral politics but if there’s one thing we have learned it is that networks of ordinary people doing ordinary things in an extraordinary way can be a powerful tool to demonstrate the kind of society that is possible. Read the full article

Are rhetorical commitments to adolescents reflected in content analysis of adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Global Financing Facility country plans?

In this 4-minute video, Dr. Asha George, a professor of health systems at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, presents highlights from her paper titled "Are rhetorical commitments to adolescents reflected in content analysis of adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Global Financing Facility country plans". This article was published as part of a supplement titled "ASRH for all in sub-Saharan Africa: Are inequalities reducing?"

Introduction to the Special Issue on “Analysing the Politics of Health Policy Change in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: The HPA Fellowship Programme 2017-2019”

This special issue presents a set of seven Health Policy Analysis (HPA) papers that offer new perspectives on health policy decision-making and implementation. They present primary empirical work from four countries in Asia and Africa, as well as reviews of literature about a wider range of low- and middle-income country (LMIC) experience. Read more

Watch the video summary by Prof. Lucy Gilson, Health Policy and Systems Division, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town

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